Associate Project Manager | Level 4 Apprenticeship

Course Code: AP0502-RC Course Type: Apprenticeships, Adult qualifications and professional Campus: Broadwater Campus Duration: 24 months learning and up to 3 months for End Point Assessment (EPA) Entry requirements: Please see entry requirements section Assessment: Multiple assessment methods

Why this apprenticeship?

Group working together at desk

Projects can be defined and delivered within different contexts, across diverse industry sectors. They can be large or small. Every project needs to be managed to ensure its success, An associate project manager knows what needs to be achieved, how it will be achieved, how long it will take and how much it will cost, and works with the project team to achieve the required outcomes. Associate project managers need good planning, organisation, leadership, management and communication skills. An associate project manager utilises resources with suitable skills, qualifications, experience and knowledge to work together in a motivated and integrated team, with clearly defined reporting lines, roles, responsibilities and authorities. Dependent upon the size of the organisations and the complexity of projects, associate project managers’ job titles will vary, but typically they can include: assistant project manager, junior project manager, project team leader. Some organisations use ‘project manager’ as a generic job title.

Open events

We run various open events throughout the year to enable you to come in to the College, see our facilities and speak with our staff.

 

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Financial support

The applicable fees for this course, including any available discounts, will be listed in the information above. 

 

How to pay

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Entry requirements

You must have an employer in place and be in a suitable role that covers the themes in the course information tab to complete this apprenticeship.

All prospective new apprentices will complete an initial assessment of their current knowledge skills and behaviours through a skill scan. This must indicate that there is substantial new knowledge skills and behaviours to be learnt by completing this apprenticeship.

A prospective apprentice will also need to show that they are currently working at or towards the minimum L2 skills for Maths and English. Where a learner has not already achieved GCSE grade 4 to 9 (A-C ) or equivalent Level 2 English and Maths Functional Skills, they must do so before taking the end-point assessment.

Entry requirements

Course content

What does this apprenticeship involve?

The objective of the qualification is to support the learner’s role in the workplace, providing the opportunity to learn and evidence knowledge and skills as part of an apprenticeship.

This qualification has been developed to support learners completing the Associate Project Manager Apprenticeship Standard and covers the knowledge, skills and behaviours of the standard.

Knowledge

An associate project manager will be able to understand and have knowledge of:

  • Project governance -Different types of organisational structures and responsibilities, functions and project phases on different types of project. How governance can control and manage the successful delivery of projects. The significance of the project management plan (PMP).
  • Project stakeholder management - Stakeholders: their perspectives, different interests and levels of influence upon project outcomes.
  • Project communication - Key contexts of a project communication plan, its effectiveness in managing different stakeholders. Factors which can affect communications such as cultural and physical barriers
  • Project leadership - The vision and values of the project and its links to objectives; the ways in which these can be effectively communicated and reinforced to team members and stakeholders. Leadership styles, qualities and the importance of motivation on team performance. Characteristics of the working environment which encourage and sustain high performance.
  • Consolidated planning - Purpose and formats for consolidated plans to support overall management, taking account of lessons learnt and how the plans balance fundamental components of scope, schedule, resources, budgets, risks and quality requirements.
  • Budgeting and cost control - Funding, estimating, overheads; direct costs, indirect costs, fixed costs, variable costs and an overall budget for a project; tracking systems for actual costs, accruals and committed costs; alternative cost breakdowns to provide for graphical representations, and performance management.
  • Business case and benefits management - Preparation and/or maintenance of business cases, including benefits management.
  • Project scope - Requirements management, and evaluation of alternative methods to learn from the past to improve delivery. Project scope change control, baseline change management, configuration management.
  • Project schedule - Scheduling and estimating for project activities including how they can be quality assessed. Progress monitoring and metrics to assess work performed against the schedule. Schedule management methods to evaluate and revise activities to improve confidence in delivery.
  • Resource management - Resource analysis, resource allocation and resource acceptance.
  • Project risk and issue management - The need for and implementation of a risk management plan. Risk management methods and techniques to identify and prioritise threats or opportunities. Mitigation actions to minimise risk impacts and to optimise benefits by managing opportunities.
  • Contract management and procurement – The nature of contracts, and their implications for contracting organisations. Procurement processes. Legal and ethical means for managing contracts.
  • Project quality - Quality management processes, assurance and improvements. Outcomes of a quality management plan, metrics for processes and quality standards.
  • Project context - The different contexts in which projects can be delivered, including health, safety, and environment management. The interdependencies between project(s), programme(s) and portfolio management. Project phases and key review points, across project life cycles.

Skills

An associate project manager will be able to demonstrate the following skills within the context of your organisation.

  • Project governance - Project monitoring and reporting cycle to track, assess and interpret performance by the application of monitoring techniques to analyse status and manage information.
  • Stakeholder and communications management - Manage stakeholders, taking account of their levels of influence and particular interests. Manage conflicts and negotiations. Communicate to a variety of different audiences. Contribute to negotiations relating to project objectives.
  • Budgeting and cost control - Develop and agree project budgets, monitor forecast and actual costs against them and control changes. Support funding submissions. Tracking systems for actual costs, accruals and committed costs; structures for alternative cost breakdowns.
  • Business case - Contribute to the preparation or maintenance of a business case including achieving required outcomes.
  • Scope management - Determine, control and manage changes to the scope of a project, including assumptions, dependencies and constraints.
  • Consolidated planning - Consolidate and document the fundamental components of projects. Monitor progress against the consolidated plan and refine as appropriate, implementing the change control process where relevant.
  • Schedule management - Prepare and maintain schedules for activities aligned to project delivery.
  • Risk, and issue management - Identify and monitor project risk or opportunity, plan and implement responses to them, contribute to a risk management plan. Respond to and manage issues within a defined governance structure.
  • Contract management and procurement - Facilitate a procurement process, contribute to the definition of contractual agreements and contribute to managing a contract.
  • Quality management - Develop a quality management plan, manage project assurance, and contribute to peer reviews. Utilise an organisation’s continual improvement process including lessons learned.
  • Resource management - Develop resource management plans for project activities, acquire and manage resources including commitment acceptance, monitor progress against plans.

Behaviours

An associate project manager will be able to demonstrate the following behaviours:

  • Collaboration and team work - Understands and is effective as part of an integrated team.
  • Leadership - Communicates direction, and supports the vision for project delivery.
  • Effective and appropriate communication - Working effectively with and influencing others, taking account of diversity and equality. Influences and facilitates effective team performance.
  • Drive for results - Demonstrates clear commitment to achieving results, and improving performance.
  • Integrity, ethics, compliance and professionalism - Promotes the wider public good in all actions, acting in a morally, legally and socially appropriate manner. Promotes and models the highest standards of professional integrity, ethics, trust and continued development.

For more detailed information please see

https://www.instituteforapprenticeships.org/apprenticeship-standards/associate-project-manager/

Further information

What can I expect from being an Apprentice?

  • Excellent vocational training.
  • A salary and on-going support from your employer and GB MET.
  • In depth experience, insight and understanding of the business sector you are working in.
  • A clear career path.
  • The opportunity to achieve industry-standard qualifications and even a degree!

 

How long does an apprenticeship take?

The duration of an apprenticeship depends on:

  • Your experience
  • Your knowledge
  • Your skill levels
  • The business sector
  • The qualification

Do I need to find an employer?

Yes, you have two options.

Option 1 - The best option is to find an employer yourself who wants to employ you as an apprentice. Once you have done this, simply provide us with the details. We will then contact your employer and handle all the administration so you can begin your apprenticeship at the earliest opportunity.

Option 2 - The GB MET recruitment team will try and find you an employer. The team will firstly invite you for an interview to fully assess your skills and aptitude for your preferred apprenticeship roles and do everything possible to find an employer with a current vacancy or one looking for an apprentice that fits the role you are looking for.

Whichever option applies, our recruitment team is here to guide you through every stage of the process.

Can I undertake an apprenticeship with my current employer?

Yes, discuss it with your employer and, if they agree and subject to conditions, you can become an apprentice where you now work.

What time of year can I start an apprenticeship?

You can apply at any time of the year. The start of your work-based training is dependent on your employer and all new Standard apprenticeships must include 20% off-the-job training.

What is off-the-job training?

Training that is delivered outside of an apprentice’s normal working duties.

Off-the-job refers to an apprentice learning outside a regular day-to-day work environment but within working hours.  This includes:

  • Practical activities such as shadowing a more skilled member of staff or ‘off-site’ visits to meet customers or attend a trade show
  • Theoretical activities such as online courses, attending seminars and role playing
  • Learning by writing reports and work-specific documents

 

Career and progression

Upon commencement, apprentices may become student members of the Association for Project Management (APM) as the first step of professional membership. Apprentices will be eligible for progression to associate membership upon successful completion of the apprenticeship. Full membership can be attained through further experience and professional development.

Why choose an apprenticeship?

  • As apprenticeships are now offering routes to degree-level qualifications they have become an increasingly preferred career option.
  • It’s an organic/natural career choice as apprentices are often offered a permanent, full-time position by their employer once training is completed.
  • Certain business sectors offer excellent career potential and the opportunity to earn very competitive salaries.
  • As an apprentice, you get to work alongside experienced staff who will help you to develop job-specific skills – and earn a wage at the same time. Earn while you learn.
  • Many employers hold Apprenticeships in high regard because they offer real industry experience.
  • A successful Apprenticeship provides you with a qualification and the skills you need for your job.

Course fees

Cost for an employer:

For levy payers the maximum funding available for this course is £6000 which will be taken from your Levy account.

For non-levy payers you will be required to pay a 5% contribution (£300) and the remaining fees will be paid for from the government. If the apprentice is 16 to 18 and they start the course before their 19th birthday they are entitled to 100% of the funding with no contribution from the employer.

 Wage for an apprentice:

The minimum wage for an apprentice is £4.15 per hour. This rate applies to those under 19 and those aged 19 or over who are in their first year of their apprenticeship. As an apprentice, you must be paid at least the minimum wage for your age if you’re aged 19 or over and have completed your first year.

The length of program based on someone working 30 hours per week, undertaking the programme for 18 months plus 3 months EPA – If working less than 30 hours per week, the length of the programme is adjusted in line with hours worked.

Course fees
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